Snowmobile Safety

Safety First — You should be aware that A SNOWMOBILE IS NOT A TOY AND CAN BE HAZARDOUS TO OPERATE. A snowmobile handles differently from other vehicles, including motorcycles, ATV's and cars. A collision or rollover can occur quickly, even during routine maneuvers such as turning and driving on hills and over obstacles, if you fail to take proper precautions.


• Carry A Basic Repair Kit.
• Carry A Basic Survival Kit.
• Check Weather Reports and Glacier Avalanche Site Before Heading Out.
• Carry A Map, Know The Area And Trail.
• Let Someone Know Where You Will Be Sledding And Your Expected Return.
• Don’t Snowmobile Alone.
• Don’t Cross Bodies Of Water Unless You Are Absolutely Sure Of Ice Thickness.
• Take Care When Crossing Public Roadways.
• Don’t Overdrive Your Lights At Night.
• ALWAYS read the owner’s manual carefully and follow the operating procedures described. Pay special attention to the warnings contained in the manual and all labels on the machine.
• Ride Sober: Don’t drink/take drugs and ride. Don’t let anyone in your group drink and ride.

 • Ride To The Right: Only makes sense. Odds are good that an automobile traveling in the left hand land of the road will sooner or later run into another car head on. The same can be said for snowmobiling. Stay to the right even on straight-aways.
• Ride At A Reasonable Speed: Drive at a speed that you can safely control your sled, if not, slow down.
• Use Hand Signals: Consistent use of a standard set of hand signals on the trail keeps movement orderly and predictable.
• Ride Defensively: Always expect the unexpected from other sledders or the terrain.
• Wildlife Always Has The Right-Of-Way: Keep an eye out for 4-legged animals. If you come up behind a moose on the trail stay far away and wait for the animal to lumber off. If any animal shows an interest in you, leave the area.
• Dress Appropriately (in layers) and Wear A Helmet: No one should operate a snowmobile without the protection of a helmet.